Review | A Study in Charlotte (Charlotte Holmes #1) by Brittany Cavallaro

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A Study in Charlotte (Charlotte Holmes #1) by Brittany Cavallaro
Published by Katherine Tegen Books on March 01, 2016
Genres: Mystery, Contemporary, Retelling, Young Adult
Pages: 321

THE BLURB

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The last thing Jamie Watson wants is a rugby scholarship to Sherringford, a Connecticut prep school just an hour away from his estranged father. But that’s not the only complication: Sherringford is also home to Charlotte Holmes, the famous detective’s great-great-great-granddaughter, who has inherited not only Sherlock’s genius but also his volatile temperament. From everything Jamie has heard about Charlotte, it seems safer to admire her from afar.

From the moment they meet, there’s a tense energy between them, and they seem more destined to be rivals than anything else. But when a Sherringford student dies under suspicious circumstances, ripped straight from the most terrifying of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Jamie can no longer afford to keep his distance. Jamie and Charlotte are being framed for murder, and only Charlotte can clear their names. But danger is mounting and nowhere is safe—and the only people they can trust are each other.

A Study in Charlotte is the first in a trilogy.

MY THOUGHTS

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A Study in Charlotte is one of those books that you won’t hate because it’s fun enough to make you want to turn just another page before bedtime. But also the kind that you won’t come to love deeply because everything is played on a safe temperatures. No sudden spikes of excitement.

I am not a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes. I haven’t got into the books. I watched the movies though not thoroughly. But you don’t have to be a Sherlock fan to enjoy this book. I personally think that this could still be enjoyable if you’re in the mood for solving light mysteries.

Basically this is about the teenage descendants of Sherlock and Watson. Two teen-agers trying to live up to their family legacy.

Like her ancestors and any other Holmes, Charlotte was raised to be logical, impassive, and most importantly deductive. She’s smart but also she’s aloof and reclusive which made her a little difficult to connect with. I didn’t particularly liked her at first because for the most part she’s just this famous Holmes and everybody thinks she’s great, hardcore, and special. But then later in the book we saw more of Charlotte’s inner battles: the rift with her family, her struggle with drug addiction. In the end she isn’t who she wants everybody to think she is. She hurts, she fears, she fails. She’s not perfect despite her impressive image, and she’s not made of stone.

Jamie Watson on the other hand is well aware of his ancestor’s relationship with the Holmes. He’d been eager to meet Charlotte since he was a child but the opportunity didn’t come until high school when a murder was set to frame them up. The thing I like about Jamie is that he is just as loyal as his great-great-grandfathers. I find it sweet. But aside from that I couldn’t find any other highlights in his character.

The main characters might be underdeveloped for me but it was fun watching Charlotte and Jamie push the story forward. How they started to become friends was a bit too fast for me. One day they don’t even know each other except that she was a Holmes and he’s a Watson, and the next they were instantly best friends. It would’ve been better if some history or flashbacks about them were provided to back it up.

I’m not really swooning for the romance but it was cute. I guess it’s the Watson falling in love with a Holmes thing. The mystery was good but not something that would keep you guessing all the while. The reveal didn’t came as thrilling and as surprising as I expect it to be. This wasn’t the best book but still worth the try.

BEAST POINTS

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