Review | Scarlet

105-50627_ch00_6P.indd

Title: Scarlet
Series Details: The Lunar Chronicles #2
Author: Marissa Meyer
Publisher: Macmillan
Imprint: Feiwel and Friends
Release Date: February 05, 2013
Genre: FantasyRetelling, Science Fiction, Young Adult 

Pages: 454

Blurb from Goodreads:

Cinder, the cyborg mechanic, returns in the second thrilling installment of the bestselling Lunar Chronicles. She’s trying to break out of prison—even though if she succeeds, she’ll be the Commonwealth’s most wanted fugitive.

Halfway around the world, Scarlet Benoit’s grandmother is missing. When Scarlet encounters Wolf, a street fighter who may have information as to her grandmother’s whereabouts, she is loath to trust this stranger, but is inexplicably drawn to him, and he to her. As Scarlet and Wolf unravel one mystery, they encounter another when they meet Cinder. Now, all of them must stay one step ahead of the vicious Lunar Queen Levana, who will do anything for the handsome Prince Kai to become her husband, her king, her prisoner.

My Thoughts-01

There is something in this book that made me love it even though I feel it’s a bit young for me. It’s Meyers’ words and wonderful writing style that flows naturally page after page. It’s the amazing and incredible characters. It’s the intriguing world where futuristic technology meets the enchanting and fanciful ideas of one of our timeless tales.

The most impressive thing in Scarlet is that it is a different story about a different girl from halfway across the world, but it connects smoothly and beautifully with Cinder’s story from the first book. They were cleverly and flawlessly weaved together. It’s also remarkable how Meyer shaped the story in her hands—so far from the original tale, so unique and distinctively her own, but is still easily recognizable as a Red Riding Hood reimagining.

Aside from the awesome characters we already knew from Cinder, Scarlet introduces a set of new characters that will surely make their marks in many readers’ hearts. None of them were perfect, but each of them has their own special qualities and strength that makes them an asset.

I must say, the females in this book are amazing. Cinder and Scarlet both have personal weaknesses, but thankfully, they aren’t just damsels that needs to be saved. They both can hold their own. Cinder is a badass when it comes to anything technology-related. Although she’s still in the process of finding her true identity, uncovering her Lunar gift, and stamping down her fears and insecurities, her growth has already been quite impressive.

Scarlet Benoit is her own brand of badass. She’s this simple and ordinary farm girl who can be fierce when the situation calls for it. She’s strong in a way that she can set her fears—and even her safety—aside, so she can protect those she loves. And this, unfortunately, is both her strength and her weakness.

The new guys are equally as interesting. Wolf is quite a complex character—a soldier with a good heart, but was trained and modified to completely surrender himself and obey his Lunar master. And this makes him so very questionable. And then there’s Carswell Thorne—handsome, and vain, and a very funny ball of sunshine. Who doesn’t love a funny ball of sunshine?

Meyer also upped the game in the bad-guys-department. The villains, in the form of Thaumaturges, appear more menacing, more powerful, more skilled in battle, and maybe even more dangerous than Levana. With our heroes and heroines having no fighting experience, facing the Thaumaturges would surely be a challenge.

The ending wasn’t very thrilling, wasn’t action-packed, wasn’t a cliff-hanger, but it will make you want to grab the next book all the same.

 

 

Five Star Rating

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s