Review | The Diabolic by S. J. Kincaid

Diabolic
Title: The Diabolic
Series: The Diabolic #1
Author: S. J. Kincaid
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Release Date: November 01, 2016
Genre: Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 416

Blurb from Goodreads:

Nemesis is a Diabolic. Created to protect a galactic Senator’s daughter, Sidonia. There’s no one Nemesis wouldn’t kill to keep her safe. But when the power-mad Emperor summons Sidonia to the galactic court as a hostage, there is only one way for Nemesis to protect Sidonia.

She must become her.

Now one of the galaxy’s most dangerous weapons is masquerading in a world of corruption and Nemesis has to hide her true abilities or risk everything. As the Empire begins to fracture and rebellion looms closer, Nemesis learns that there is something stronger than her deadly force: the one thing she’s been told she doesn’t have – humanity. And, amidst all the danger, action and intrigue, her humanity might be the only thing that can save her, Sidonia and the entire Empire…

My Thoughts-01

Let’s talk about this beast of a book that is The Diabolic. This is my first encounter with S. J. Kincaid’s writing and the first thing I could think of after reading this is that it’s good… and it’s brutal! Anyway I loved it. This book presents a battle between cunning minds, backstabbing royalties, and dark machinations. This gripping futuristic story had me holding my breath for most part of the book! All of Kincaid’s characters were very calculating and dangerous and I love how each of them tries to outsmart the others throughout the book, making this more than just interesting—it’s gritty and nail-biting too.

Despite having a slow start, I found a lot of things to love in this book. The characters were masterfully crafted. The world-building was enthralling. Even the complicated political maneuverings will draw you into the story. Then there’s the series of plot twists that were so cleverly placed—some of it I saw coming, some had unexpectedly surprised me. But what I really love on top of all is the idea of a humanoid protagonist designed to be lethal for the sole purpose of protecting the one person they were scientifically bonded with. Read More »

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Review | Carve the Mark (Carve the Mark #1) by Veronica Roth

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Carve the Mark (Carve the Mark #1) by Veronica Roth
Published by HarperCollins on January 17, 2017
Genre : Science Fiction, Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages : 468

THE BLURB

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Cyra is the sister of the brutal tyrant who rules the Shotet people. Cyra’s currentgift gives her pain and power — something her brother exploits, using her to torture his enemies. But Cyra is much more than just a blade in her brother’s hand: she is resilient, quick on her feet, and smarter than he knows.

Akos is the son of a farmer and an oracle from the frozen nation-planet of Thuvhe. Protected by his unusual currentgift, Akos is generous in spirit, and his loyalty to his family is limitless. Once Akos and his brother are captured by enemy Shotet soldiers, Akos is desperate to get this brother out alive — no matter what the cost.

The Akos is thrust into Cyra’s world, and the enmity between their countries and families seems insurmountable. Will they help each other to survive, or will they destroy one another?
Carve the Mark is Veronica Roth’s stunning portrayal of the power of friendship — and love — in a galaxy filled with unexpected gifts.

MY THOUGHTS

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Veronica Roth takes us up in space in her second series which is a mix of sci-fi and fantasy. I am more of a fantasy reader than a sci-fi reader. Talks of space wars and space ships and all other science-y terms associated with it just doesn’t appeal to me that much. But I know what Star Wars is and I wouldn’t compare this book to it. This was set in outer space and there has been some travelling from one planet to another but that’s all there is for the sci-fi side. The rest is fantasy.  Read More »

Review | Replica (Replica #1) by Lauren Oliver

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Replica (Replica #1) by Lauren Oliver
Published by HarperCollins on October 04, 2016
Genres: Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 520

THE BLURB

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Lyra

From a distance, the Haven Institute, tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida, looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth, it is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed.

But when a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects—Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72—manage to escape. As they make their way through a new and menacing environment, they meet a stranger named Gemma, who has embarked on a perilous quest of her own. And as Lyra tries to understand Haven’s purpose, she uncovers earth-shattering secrets that will change the lives of both girls.

Gemma

Gemma has been in and out of hospitals her whole life. A sickly child, she has grown into a lonely adolescent whose life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April.

But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family’s past and discovers her father’s mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two human models, or replicas, 24 and 72—and a completely new set of questions. As Gemma tries to unravel the mysteries of Haven, she learnes terrible truths about herself and her family that will threaten to destroy everything she loves.

Two girls, two stories, one novel.

While the stories of Gemma and Lyra mirror each other, each contains revelations critically important to the other story. Their narratives can be read separately or in alternating chapters.

MY THOUGHTS

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Monsters, they call us. Demons.
Sometimes, on sleepless nights, we wonder if they’re right.

The fact that the author is giving me a number of ways on how to read this book filled me with excitement. So we have two separate protagonists: Lyra and Gemma. And it’s your choice whose POV you’re reading first or whose world you’ll jump into the next chapter. The thing is, you’re in control. Read More »

Review | The Thousandth Floor (The Thousandth Floor #1) by Katharine McGee

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The Thousandth Floor (The Thousandth Floor #1) by Katharine McGee
Published by HarperCollins on August 30, 2016
Genres: Fiction, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 441

THE BLURB

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New York City as you’ve never seen it before. A thousand-story tower stretching into the sky. A glittering vision of the future, where anything is possible—if you want it enough.

Welcome to Manhattan, 2118.

A hundred years in the future, New York is a city of innovation and dreams. But people never change: everyone here wants something…and everyone has something to lose.

Leda Cole’s flawless exterior belies a secret addiction—to a drug she never should have tried and a boy she never should have touched.

Eris Dodd-Radson’s beautiful, carefree life falls to pieces when a heartbreaking betrayal tears her family apart.

Rylin Myers’s job on one of the highest floors sweeps her into a world—and a romance—she never imagined…but will her new life cost Rylin her old one?

Watt Bakradi is a tech genius with a secret: he knows everything about everyone. But when he’s hired to spy by an upper-floor girl, he finds himself caught up in a complicated web of lies.

And living above everyone else on the thousandth floor is Avery Fuller, the girl genetically designed to be perfect. The girl who seems to have it all—yet is tormented by the one thing she can never have.

Debut author Katharine McGee has created a breathtakingly original series filled with high-tech luxury and futuristic glamour, where the impossible feels just within reach. But in this world, the higher you go, the farther there is to fall…

MY THOUGHTS

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“Sometimes love and chaos mean the same thing.”

Welcome to 2118 where millions of people live in a thousand-storey skyscraper. Though living in the same tower, the divide between the wealthy and the poor is clearly visible. The higher you are in the tower the wealthier you are.

I go into this feeling a little skeptic because I’m not a big fan of futuristic settings. Sometimes books with this kind of theme have this tendency to give a lot of descriptions about things that are quite hard to picture in my mind. But The Thousandth Floor isn’t one of those, thankfully. Read More »